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Flood Watch At Rogue Farms

The National Weather Service has issued a Flood Watch for Rogue Farms of Independence as massive “river of moisture” takes aim at Northwest Oregon. Starting Saturday afternoon, the region will be pounded with as much as foot of rain in just 24 hours.

When water levels in the Willamette River peak on Tuesday evening, our 42-acre hopyard will be buried under seven feet of water.

Rogue Farms Freedom Hops during the Great Flood of January, 2012.

Rogue Farms Freedom Hops during the Great Flood of January, 2012.

Here’s a look at what we’re expecting. The red line represents the “official” flood stage. But the orange line tells us when we’ll flood at Rogue Farms. If these predictions hold, water will start rushing over Wigrich Road Sunday evening, and the floodwaters won’t recede until sometime on Christmas Day.

Willamette River Graph

That gives us about 48-hours to get ready. We’re pulling heavy equipment off the fields, tucking our Potbellied Pigs Voo and Doo into their pen, and moving our 7,140,289 honeybees to higher ground near the Chatoe Rogue Tasting Room.

The Chatoe Rogue, Hop ‘N’ Bed, Coleman Conference Center and hop processing facility are located on the one area of the farm that has never flooded. We’ll be high and dry, but stranded with no way in or out for at least three days.

Moving our honeybees out of the flood zone in March of 2012.

Moving our honeybees out of the flood zone in March of 2012.

Winter flooding is a part of the way of life here at Rogue Farms. It’s the price you pay to grow hops, corn, wheat, rye, pumpkins, jalapeños and honey in the rich, alluvial soils along the Willamette River. We farm in collaboration with Mother Nature, and sometimes she likes to remind us who’s in charge.

When the storms have passed and the floods have receded, come on out to Rogue Farms and see how we grow beers, spirits, ciders and sodas!

roguefarms grow the revolution

Guardians Of The Dirt

One of the most valuable resources for any farmer is dirt. While most of us take dirt for granted, a farmer knows that the right kind of soil is crucial to growing crops.

Dirt isn’t cheap. It took millions of years of Ice Age floods and winter flooding of the Willamette River to create the alluvial soils we love so much at Rogue Farms. So we do what we can to protect our soil from the devastating effects of erosion.

Meet the guardians of the dirt.

Barley Close Up

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Hops, Hogs And Holidays

Join us for our final blow out party of the year, Hops, Hogs & Holidays, this Saturday at Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon.

It’ll be a day of Holiday crafts, live music, a visit by Santa and we’ll wrap it up with a big ham feast. Please see below for more information, or call Rogue Farms at 503-838-9813.

Hops Hogs Holidays Poster

Growing Beer, Stick By Stick

What’s the difference between a hopyard and field of weeds? It’s the trellis system.

It wasn’t until our brewing forefathers learned how to grow hops on a trellis, away from the damp soil and exposed to the sun, that the wild plant known as Humulus lupulus became a cultivated crop and one of the key ingredients in beer.

A hopyard trellis will last for five decades or longer. But ever once in a while, you need to get down in the dirt and do some repairs.

Empty Hopyard

With no hops growing and the rhizomes dormant underground, winter is the best time for hopyard repairs.

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Trimming The Tree

Trimming the tree has a whole different meaning here in the heart of Oregon hazelnut country that surrounds us at Rogue Farms.

It has nothing to do with ornaments, lights or popcorn strung around a Christmas tree. For hazelnut growers, like our neighbors at Kirk Family Filberts, it’s seriously hard work that’s essential for a bountiful harvest next fall.

Orchard

Pruned branches are lined up on the orchard floor to make clean up easier.

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Homemade For The Holidays At Rogue Farms

Our next DIY Workshop, making your own Winter Crafts, will be held at Rogue Farms Sunday, December 6th.

The Workshop is free, but we’re asking everyone to bring two cans of food which will be donated to the Ellen Curran Food Bank in Independence, Oregon. Come learn how to make your own winter crafts and help us support the local community.

Farms-Workshop-WinterCrafts-12062014

How We Grow Whiskey

Here’s what two week old whiskey really looks like.

The start of the 2015 Dream Rye crop at Rogue Farms.

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Where Great Beer Comes From

Our friends at the Grand Hotel in Salem, Oregon are helping us spread the word about the GYO/DIY Revolution. Click on the image to read what they said about Rogue Farms and be sure to vote for us in the USA Today/10Best contest for Best Brewery Tour.

Where Great Beer Comes From

Piggies In A Blanket

Just as we prepare our hops and honeybees for winter, this week it was time for our celebrity Potbellied Pigs, Voo and Doo. Voo and Doo are hardy creatures but even they need a warm place to sleep. One of our chores this week at Rogue Farms was to winterize their home.

Bed_111914_002

We laid down a thick layer of hay and cedar chips for them to snuggle in.

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Vote For Rogue Farms As Best Brewery Tour In America

Rogue Farms has been nominated for Best Brewery Tour by the readers of USA Today and 10Best. Finally, an election that really matters.

Click on the image below to cast your vote for Rogue Farms and show your support for the GYO Revolution!

10Best

 

Girl plus a Beer

A girls gotta brew, what a girls gotta brew. Pacific Northwest//PDX born and bred.

The Whiskey Wash

Covering great whiskies one bottle at a time

The Cocktail Challenge

Our attempt at mixing, drinking and tinkering aka getting drunk and feeling fancy

east happyland beer garden

Gardening hops, grains, vegetables, and brewing beer in South Louisiana. And they said it couldn't be done....

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