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Posts from the ‘Critters’ Category

Piggies In A Blanket

Just as we prepare our hops and honeybees for winter, this week it was time for our celebrity Potbellied Pigs, Voo and Doo. Voo and Doo are hardy creatures but even they need a warm place to sleep. One of our chores this week at Rogue Farms was to winterize their home.

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We laid down a thick layer of hay and cedar chips for them to snuggle in.

But our pigs are creatures of habit. They don’t handle change well. They eyed us suspiciously through the door.

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Voo was the first who dared enter the new surroundings.

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Seeing that no ill harm came to Voo, Doo swaggered in as if it was his idea all along.

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To give you an idea of how our pigs’ minds work, they assumed we had laid out a giant feast for them. They noshed on the bedding for 30 minutes before they realized it wasn’t edible.

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Once they caught on, Voo and Doo leapt into the pile and burrowed to make their beds.

The next time you come to Rogue Farms to enjoy one of our beers, spirits, ciders or sodas, be sure to drop in on Voo and Doo in their new digs.

roguefarms grow the revolution

Taking Care Of Our Honeybees

Autumn is one of the busiest times of year for the beekeeper at Rogue Farms.

There’s no more wild sources of nectar and pollen for our honeybees to forage and soon it will be too cold for them to leave the hive. So in the next few weeks our beekeeper has 7,140,289 mouths to feed, medicate and shelter before winter arrives.

The bees took care of us this spring and summer by pollinating our crops and making the honey we used in our kolsch, mead, braggot and sodas. Now it’s our turn to take care of them.

Honey Harvest

A scene from this year’s honey harvest at Rogue Farms.

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The Honey Harvest Begins!

Every July we make plans for the harvest season at Rogue Farms.

The Risk™ malting barley harvest in Tygh Valley kicks things off mid-month, followed by our seven varieties of hops at our farm in Independence in August. But you know what they say about making plans.

This year, Mother Nature and the 7,140,289 Rogue Farms honeybees decided it was time to shake things up.

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Flower Power For Our Honeybees

This is the greatest time of year to be a Rogue Farms honeybee.

We’re in the middle of the summer nectar flow, when gazillions of wildflowers, blackberry flowers and clover fill the fields surrounding our farm.

It’s the honeybee’s version of an all you can eat for free buffet. But for our bees, that’s not good enough.

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Back In The Land Of Hops And Honey

Feel that buzz in the air at Rogue Farms?

That's our honeybees, just back from a working vacation in California.

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Blossoms In Your Beer

We can’t think of a prettier place to be than spring time in a cherry orchard.

Stroll among the trees and feel the orchards glow in soft hues of white and pink. A gentle breeze sends petals drifting lazily through the air.

Stand still for a moment and take in the quiet. Because, if you listen very carefully, you’ll hear a slight buzz.

That’s the sound of our Rogue Farms honeybees.

April in the cherry orchards next door to Rogue Farms.

April in the cherry orchards next door to Rogue Farms.

The blossoming of the cherry orchards marks the beginning of the spring nectar flow, a time of year when the Wigrich Appellation offers an amazing buffet of flowers for our honeybees. As the cherries fade away, the pears will come into bloom, to be followed by the apple trees. Thousands of wildflowers dot the landscape.

All a bee has to do is fly off in any direction and it will soon find a nice source of nectar and pollen. But they seem to take a shine to cherry blossoms.

A closer look at the cherry blossoms.

A closer look at the cherry blossoms.

We started keeping honeybees because we wanted to create another ingredient to our proprietary palate of flavors of known origin. Because nothing says terroir quite like honey.

From spring until the end of summer our 7,140,289 honeybees will sample all the flavors of the Wigrich Appellation including; hazelnuts, our Dream Pumpkins, our jalapeños, our marionberries, cherries, apples, wild blackberries, clover, and a gazillion other wild flowers.

Rogue Farms Wildflower honey is truly a taste of place.

Rogue Farms honeybees returning from a trip to the cherry orchards.

Rogue Farms honeybees returning from a trip to the cherry orchards.

You can try putting cherry blossoms in your beer, or you could let our honeybees do it for you. This year’s crop of Rogue Farms honey will be put to good use by John Maier as he crafts future batches of 19 Original Colonies Mead, Honey Kolsch and Marionberry Braggot.

Spring has arrived at Rogue Farms! Come join us for another season of growing beer, spirits and honey.

roguefarms we grow beer and spirits_web

 

 

Water, Water, Everywhere

Mother Nature can be quite stubborn.

More than a week after having to close Rogue Farms because of flooding, the only road leading into the farm is still impassable. High water and fast moving currents make it unsafe for anything other than big wheeled farm equipment.

We’ve been able to return. But we’re not ready to let visitors back in and will stay closed through the weekend.

Covered in high, rushing water, the road into Rogue Farms is still to dangerous for most vehicles.

Covered in high, rushing water, the road into Rogue Farms is still to dangerous for most vehicles.

You can see that in some areas of the farm, the floods are receding. But the latest forecast for the Willamette River says water levels will remain high for at least the next few days.

Just days ago, this part of the hopyard was drowning under several feet of water.

Just days ago, this part of the hopyard was drowning under several feet of water.

The water remains high in other parts of the farm. We're callling this area Lake Wigrich.

But water remains high in other parts of the farm. We’re calling this area Lake Wigrich.

Finally today, a little bit of sunshine coming through the clouds. The Free Range Chicks and Royal Palm Turkey finally had a chance to get out on the lawn and gobble up some earthworms.

A brief appearance by the sun. More rain is expected this weekend.

A brief appearance by the sun. More rain is expected this weekend.

Right now, we hope to be open for visitors on Wednesday. But please check here on RogueFarms.com for the latest information or call us at 503-838-9813. 

Come join us at Rogue Farms this winter and see how we grow beer and spirits – come rain or shine!

roguefarms we grow beer and spirits_web

The Honey That Almost Got Away

We made a sweet discovery this week while laying down some gravel for our new parking lot at Rogue Farms.

Winnie The Pooh would be so proud.

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Fall Colors At Rogue Farms

Everyone who comes out to the Rogue barley farm in Tygh Valley remarks about how beautiful it is.

Mt. Hood. The wildlife. The amber waves of barley. But in fall, the farm is especially stunning.

Please enjoy these photos of some of our favorite scenes this fall.

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The Buzz On Winter

Bee Workshop 5.17.12 (24) webWith the days growing short and temperatures dropping, it’s time to get the Rogue Farms honeybees ready for winter.

For most of the year they’ve been collecting nectar and making honey for our mead, kolsch and braggot.

Now it’s our turn to take care of them.

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The Cocktail Challenge

Our attempt at mixing, drinking and tinkering aka getting drunk and feeling fancy

east happyland beer garden

Gardening hops, grains, vegetables, and brewing beer in South Louisiana. And they said it couldn't be done....

A Pub With Brick Walls

~the literary side of craft beer~

Grow More Hops!

Locally brewed beer deserves locally grown hops!

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