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Posts tagged ‘buzz’

Bees Latest Buzz

Honeybees Rogue FarmsRogue Farms knows bees and will soon be building more nucs to add more colonies to increase honey production.

Nuc is beekeeping slang for nucleus, a small group of workers, drones, a new queen and a mini-hive with enough food and brood to get them started on becoming their own colony.

Beekeepers buy nucs to add more colonies and increase honey production. Or they may build a nuc from one of their current colonies. This splits the hive and prevents swarming.

Either way, the key to a successful nuc is making sure the new queen gets along with the workers before she’s introduced. A special device, called a queen excluder, separates the queen from the rest of the hive until it’s clear that everyone is getting along.

Rogue Grows Bees

Good signs:

–      The workers are feeding the new queen through the excluder.

Bad signs:

–      The workers are trying to kill the new queen – also known as balling the queen.

–      The workers are producing emergency queen cells, which means they’ve rejected the new queen and want to produce one of their own.

Whether a nuc is a success or a failure should be obvious in about eight days. After that it’s okay to remove the excluder. And then after about a month, the new colony can be moved out of the mini-hive and into a regular one and begin foraging and producing honey.

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Re-Queening the Hives

Rogue Beekeeper Josh re-queened some of our hives recently. He discovered some of the hives didn’t have queens and others had queens that were failing to show proper leadership.

The bottom line as far as we’re concerned – not enough honey.

So change was needed. So Josh and his friend Andy headed out to the hives and did what had to be done.

Oregon Honey Bees

Step One: Josh looks for the old queen. When he finds her, she is summarily dispatched with a quick pinch.

Step Two: The new Queen arrives in a small cage.

Step Three: The cage is inserted into the hive.

Step Four: The worker bees nibble away at a sugar plug that blocks the entrance to the cage. It takes a few days for the bees to eat their way through. This gives them time to adapt to the new queen.

 

 

 

Have you heard the buzz?

If you didn’t know already, the Rogue Farms Micro Hopyard is home to 19 colonies of honeybees. Check them out with these photos!

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