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Posts tagged ‘Rogue Ales’

High Strung Hops

Yes, it seems silly to get excited over string.

But this was no ordinary shipment via UPS. When the string arrived at Rogue Farms, the delivery folks unloaded dozens of bales weighing hundreds of pounds apiece. In all, we now have 253 miles of string.

Bales of string

Just some of the bales of string that arrived at Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon.

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Our Bees Are Media Stars

Bees To CA 5When we last checked in with the Rogue Farms honeybees, they were shipping out south to spend the winter pollinating an almond orchard near Tracy, California.

Much to our surprise, their story caught the attention of the Oregon Beer Growler, which wanted to know why we’d go to so much trouble for our bees.

Here’s what they discovered.

“The journey across state lines and back again may sound like one big endeavor for a bunch of bees, but their contribution to the flavor of beer and the health of the environment in general is truly greater than their physical size.” -Oregon Beer Growler.

Click on the image to read the February issue online and see what’s happening in Oregon’s beer scene. Then head to page 18 to read about our honeybees.

Beer Growler

Behind The Scenes At Rogue Farms

At the end of every one of these stories we invite you to come visit us at Rogue Farms.

For us, there’s nothing better than showing folks how beer and spirits begin in the dirt. Spend a day with us and we’ll open your eyes to how that Rogue you’re drinking is actually a farm product, made with crops that we planted, grew and harvested ourselves.

Here’s what you might see on any given day at Rogue Farms.

Walk Among The Hops

Brewmaster John Maier in the rows of Rogue Farms Freedom hops.

Brewmaster John Maier in the rows of Rogue Farms Freedom hops in August.

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Game Day With Rogue

Beer Tasting On The Farm

Trying out the beers at Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon.

Nobody knows us better than the people who live near Rogue Farms. They’re not shy with their opinions about our farm grown beers and spirits.

Naturally we were pleased when one of the local foodies singled out Rogue as must-have beer for this weekend’s Super Bowl parties.

Rogue offers an extensive collection of styles — some very unique, like its series of Voodoo Doughnut-inspired brews (Lemon Chiffon Crueller Ale or Chocolate, Peanut Butter Banana Ale anyone?) — making it likely guests will find something to their liking.

-Polk Itemizer Observer, A Super Spread For Your Super Party

Like the article says, when it comes to beer, spirits and wine, we have an embarrassment of riches here in Oregon. It makes us appreciate even more how hard we have to work to keep growing world class beers, spirits, ciders and sodas.

Feel free to join at Rogue Farms on Super Bowl Sunday. We’ll have the game on, and you can enjoy our beers on the farm where we grow the ingredients to brew it.

roguefarms grow the revolution

Our Honeybees California Vacation

At Rogue Farms we’re used to getting up before the sun. But today began especially early, as we loaded up our 7,140,289 honeybees for the start of their California vacation.

Bees To CA 1

Our bees will spend the next couple of months pollinating an almond orchard near Tracy, California. That’s a 600-mile drive to the south, and an early start was necessary because we want to arrive by tonight. The less time on the road, the less stress on our honeybees.

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Muddied, But Open

The floods that closed Rogue Farms for several days last week are drawing down. The road is now passable, and we’re open for business all week.

Normally, we’d be closed today and Tuesday. But we want to make sure you’re stocked up on beer from our New Year’s Garage Sale for your parties.

What you’ll see when you drive in is a lot of mud in the fields.

Muddy Hopyard

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Growing Beer, Stick By Stick

What’s the difference between a hopyard and field of weeds? It’s the trellis system.

It wasn’t until our brewing forefathers learned how to grow hops on a trellis, away from the damp soil and exposed to the sun, that the wild plant known as Humulus lupulus became a cultivated crop and one of the key ingredients in beer.

A hopyard trellis will last for five decades or longer. But ever once in a while, you need to get down in the dirt and do some repairs.

Empty Hopyard

With no hops growing and the rhizomes dormant underground, winter is the best time for hopyard repairs.

to continue reading click on the photo

Piggies In A Blanket

Just as we prepare our hops and honeybees for winter, this week it was time for our celebrity Potbellied Pigs, Voo and Doo. Voo and Doo are hardy creatures but even they need a warm place to sleep. One of our chores this week at Rogue Farms was to winterize their home.

Bed_111914_002

We laid down a thick layer of hay and cedar chips for them to snuggle in.

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The Start Of Spring Planting

Unless you’re a farmer, what we’re about to tell you may not make a lot of sense. Not at first.

We started working the fields where we’ll plant our Dare spring malting barley. Actually drilling seeds in the ground? No. That’s five to six months from now. But there’s a lot to do between now and planting time.

Plowing a field of spring barley begins in the fall at Rogue Farms in Tygh Valley, Oregon.

Plowing a field of spring barley begins in the fall at Rogue Farms in Tygh Valley, Oregon.

click on the photo to continue reading

Pig On The Mend

Apples...

It’s been over a week since we put the pigs on arthritis medicine and the difference is amazing.

To be honest, it’s also quite a relief to see that Voo and Doo have plenty of life left in them

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hops - belgian bar

The random thoughts of a Cheshire publican.

Mr. and Mrs. Beer

52 Breweries in 52 Weeks

Girl plus a Beer

A girls gotta brew, what a girls gotta brew. Pacific Northwest//PDX born and bred.

The Whiskey Wash

Covering great whiskies one bottle at a time

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