Skip to content

Posts from the ‘Rogue Farms’ Category

Welcome Back Honeybees

That buzz you hear on the drive into Rogue Farms is the sound of our 7,140,289 honeybees back from their working vacation.

They spent winter pollinating an almond orchard near Tracy, California. We brought them back just in time for the start of the spring nectar flow.

Some of the hives near the entrance to Rogue Farms. FYI, we won't plant the jalapeños until June.

Some of the hives near the entrance to Rogue Farms. FYI, we won’t plant the jalapeños until June.

A nectar flow is when plants go into overtime producing nectar to attract honeybees. This is a period of fierce competition. Gazillions of flowers are blooming, each trying to lure a honeybee with the promise of nectar in exchange for the bee’s pollination services.

The spring nectar flow at Rogue Farms includes alder, birch and big leaf maple trees, plus wildflowers and garden flowers. The apple trees will bloom soon and the cherry orchards are dressed up in hues of pink and white.

The cherry orchard next to Rogue Farms.

The cherry orchard next to Rogue Farms.

Our honeybees don’t waste any time getting to work. A nectar flow means a generous supply of food that will help the hives build up their populations so they can be ready for the next big nectar flow that starts in summer.

bees at work

The bees arrived after dark and by the next morning were already foraging among the flowers of Rogue Farms.

We prepared for the honeybees return by repairing their hive boxes and giving some a fresh coat of paint.

branded hives

Showing our pride in the hard work of the Rogue Farms honeybees.

Spring is one of the best times to see for yourself how we grow beer and spirits. The bees are buzzing, the hops are emerging and the garden is growing. Soon we’ll plant marionberries, Dream Pumpkins, Wigrich Corn and jalapeños. Each crop brings a unique flavor to the proprietary palate of flavors we grow for Rogue Ales, Spirits, Ciders and Sodas.

Come join us! For directions to Rogue Farms and hours of operation, please click here.

roguefarms grow the revolution

Stringing And Staking Our Hops

Just a few days into spring and we’re starting our first big chore of the season – stringing and staking our 42-acre hopyard. The job requires nearly a dozen farmhands and days of back breaking work. But if you want to grow your own beer, this is what you got to do. It starts with the string…

JSL_1172

The string is called coir, a biodegradable twine made from Sri Lanka cocoanut husks.

Read more

The First Signs Of Beer

We took a stroll through our hopyard this morning and look at what we found!

The first bines of the season are emerging from the soil. They’re so tiny, about the size of a bottle cap, we almost didn’t see them.

A new bine pokes through the dirt in the 42-acre hopyard at Rogue Farms.

A new bine pokes through the dirt in the 42-acre hopyard at Rogue Farms.

Read more

Spring Planting In The Revolution Garden

The calendar may say winter, but it feels like spring here at Rogue Farms. It’s been four to five to degrees warmer than normal for the past few months. Everything is running ahead of schedule.

So thank you Mother Nature for giving us a head start on spring planting in the Revolution Garden.

Garden8

Planting irises. We’re not interested in the flowers, but care very much about the rhizomes. Better known as Orris Root, they add floral notes and aroma to our gins.

Some of last year’s botanicals, like Chamomile, are dormant and will emerge later in the month. Add to that Angelica, Coriander, Juniper, Cucumbers, Ginger and the above mentioned Orris Root. We’re also planting Grains of Paradise, a spice native to West Africa. We don’t know how it will do in the terroir of the Willamette Valley, but we’re willing to take the risk and follow our dream of growing more of our own ingredients for Rogue Spirits Spruce Gin and Pink Spruce Gin.

A garden in late winter is like a blank canvas, waiting to be filled with flavors and aromas.

A garden in late winter is like a blank canvas, waiting to be filled with flavors and aromas.

We’re also planting some traditional garden crops, vegetables and spices that we pick, cook and serve guests here at the farm.

That includes broccoli…

Garden23

Kale…

Garden18

…and Mustard Greens.

Garden10

Join us this summer for one of our farm fresh lunches or dinners and bring home a bottle of Rogue Spirits gin. Both are made with flavors from the same place, the Revolution Garden of Rogue Farms.

At Rogue Farms we’re dedicated to crafting all our beers, spirits, ciders and sodas using ingredients we grow ourselves. Come join the grow your own Revolution!

roguefarms grow the revolution

Our New Crop Of Beer And Spirits

With an early spring at Rogue Farms in Tygh Valley, this year’s crop of Risk™ malting barley is off to a good start.

After laying dormant during the cold season, the shoots have resumed growing and are nearly three inches tall.

Risk in Field

Mt. Hood peeks through an irrigation wheel at Rogue Farms in Tygh Valley, Oregon.

Since we’re surrounded by wildlife, we often get some interesting visitors wandering through the fields.

Read more

Revenge Of The Slugs

You’re not going to believe this. We don’t quite believe it ourselves.

A few weeks ago we noticed that something odd was going on in our field of Dream Rye. Shoots were disappearing and being overtaken by grass. At first, it seemed like no big deal. The changes were subtle. But the shoots continued dying and the grass spread even further. Eventually we lost nearly all 20 acres of the Dream Rye we planted just a few months ago.

This is what happened.

Banana Slug OSU Extension

A banana slug. Photo courtesy Oregon State Extension Service.

Read more

Rogue Gets Goosed

It’s become a rite of winter at Rogue Farms in Tygh Valley, Oregon. A battle with invaders from the north.

Hundreds of Canada Geese descend upon the farm this time of year to raid our Risk™ malting barley. From the air, the vast fields of green barley shoots are a target that’s too attractive to pass up.

We go on the counter offensive, harassing the geese with rifle shots in the air, riding through fields in our ATVs, or sending the dogs out to chase them away. These skirmishes drag on for weeks or months.

A flock of Canada Geese arrive at Rogue Farms to join their birds of a feather in the annual raids on our barley fields.

A flock of Canada Geese arrive at Rogue Farms to join their birds of a feather in the annual raids on our barley fields.

This year, the geese outsmarted us.

Read more

Rogue Farms, In Pictures

As much as we love sharing the story of Rogue Farms, and our grow your own, craft it yourself way of doing things – we especially appreciate it when others share it too.

Take a look at what Craft Brewing Business did with the pictures from our Winter Crop Report. They created a beautiful photo essay showing the highlights of what we’ve done over the past months to grow our beers, spirits, ciders and sodas. Click on the image below to view the full story.

Cover copy

How To Prepare Your Garden For Spring With Rogue Farms

Gardening USDAWith spring almost here, Rogue Farms is here to help you prepare your garden for another season of growing fruit, vegetables and flowers.

Come join us Saturday, February 28th for our next DIY Workshop, Preparing Your Garden For Spring.

When’s the best time to plant? How do you make your own compost? Our experts will answer all your questions, and maybe even answer some you hadn’t thought about.

The workshop starts at 2pm, is free and open to all ages. All you have to do is show up. For more information, please visit our event page on Facebook. For directions on to the farm, click here.

Growing your own and doing it yourself is something we believe in strongly at Rogue Farms, and these workshops are one of the ways we share our passion for GYO and DIY.

The Rogue Farms Revolution Garden where we grow vegetables and spices for our sodas and gins.

The Rogue Farms Revolution Garden where we grow vegetables and herbs for our sodas and gins.

High Strung Hops

Yes, it seems silly to get excited over string.

But this was no ordinary shipment via UPS. When the string arrived at Rogue Farms, the delivery folks unloaded dozens of bales weighing hundreds of pounds apiece. In all, we now have 253 miles of string.

Bales of string

Just some of the bales of string that arrived at Rogue Farms in Independence, Oregon.

Read more

@ beer affair

A love affair with beer based in Brooklyn, N.Y.

hops - belgian bar

The random thoughts of a Cheshire publican.

Mr. and Mrs. Beer

52 Breweries in 52 Weeks

Girl plus a Beer

A girls gotta brew, what a girls gotta brew. Pacific Northwest//PDX born and bred.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 518 other followers